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Tips for a safe Halloween

Article Published 10/27/2016

Children, on average, are more than twice as likely to be hit by a car on Halloween than on any other day of the year. As such, drivers in Layton City are reminded to slow down on Monday, Oct. 31, from about 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Motorists should also not drink alcohol and drive.
In addition, here are some other tips for a safe Halloween:

• Decorate costumes and bags with reflective tape or stickers and, if possible, choose light colors. Since masks can sometimes obstruct a child’s vision, try non-toxic face paint and makeup whenever possible.

• Have kids use glow sticks or flashlights to help them see and be seen by drivers.

• Children under the age of 12 should not be alone at night without adult supervision. If kids are mature enough to be out without supervision, remind them to stick to familiar areas that are well lit and trick-or-treat in groups.

• When selecting a costume make sure it is the right size to prevent trips and falls.

• Warn children not to eat any treats before an adult has carefully examined them for evidence of tampering.

• Children should wear well-fitting, sturdy shoes. 

• All children should WALK, not run from house to house and use the sidewalk if available, rather than walk in the street.

• Children should be cautioned against running out from between parked cars, or across lawns and yards where ornaments, furniture, etc., may present dangers. 

• Children should go only to homes where the residents are known and have outside lights on as a sign of welcome. 

• Children should not enter homes or apartments unless they are accompanied by an adult. 

• People expecting trick-or-treaters should remove anything that could be an obstacle from lawns, steps and porches. Candlelit jack-o'-lanterns should be kept away from landings and doorsteps where costumes could brush against the flame.

• Indoor jack-o'-lanterns should be kept away from curtains, decorations, and other furnishings that could be ignited. 

SOURCES: www.safekids.org
and www.cpsc.gov